National African Federated Chamber of Commerce and Industry

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The National African Federated Chamber of Commerce and Industry (NAFCOC) is a business chamber in South Africa, established in 1964.[1]

NAFCOC’s vision is to “be the leading voice of business in South Africa”.[1]

Background

Key Staff

In December 2018, Sabelo Macingwane was elected NAFCOC President.[2]

NAFCOC's previous President was Lawrence Mavundla.[3] Mavundla has served as a Council Member of the Free Market Foundation (FMF),[4] a right-wing South African think tank which is an Atlas Network partner, and which has a history of working on behalf of the tobacco industry. In 1988 Mavundla received the FMF’s Free Market Award for an “exceptional contribution to the course of Economic Freedom”.[4] Mavundla and the FMF worked together in 2016 and 2017 to oppose alcohol regulation in South Africa.[5][6]

Relationship with the Tobacco Industry

History of BAT Funding

Internal reports by British American Tobacco (BAT) Industries Plc state that the company provided NAFCOC with financial assistance between 1980 and 1983,[7][8][9][10] as well as assistance with organising business conferences and seminars,[10][11] and with other “various projects”.[12]

Later reports suggest BAT made annual financial contributions to NAFCOC between 1986 and at least 1992.[13][14][15][16][17] These reports were filed as part of BAT’s obligations under the European Community’s Code of Conduct for European firms in South Africa, which required companies operating in South Africa to report their progress in relation to advancing wage equality and working for non-white employees.[18]

As at January 2019, NAFCOC does not publish information about its funding sources on its website.

Opposed Draft South African Tobacco Control Bill

In May 2018 the Government of South Africa announced its intention to introduce the Control of Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Systems Bill, aimed at strengthening the country's tobacco legislation.[19] The Bill proposed several measures strongly opposed by the tobacco industry, including Plain Packaging. NAFCOC expressed strong opposition to this Bill and has argued in the media that:

  • The proposed interventions are excessive
  • It would compromise individuals’ personal freedom and the right to decide to smoke
  • Personal freedoms are protected by the Constitution
  • It could effectively mean an “outright ban” on smoking
  • It would reduce the right of businesses to compete
  • It could lead to an increase in tobacco smuggling.[20]

A peer-reviewed study from Bath University researchers has found that several of these misleading arguments have been used repeatedly by the tobacco industry in opposition to tobacco control measures.[21] The study also showed that the tobacco industry has a history of using third party organisations, in an effort to make its anti-legislation arguments appear more credible.[21]

For more information on the tobacco industry’s opposition to South Africa's draft Bill, including the arguments and tactics used, go to South Africa: Industry Interference with the Control of Tobacco Products and Electronic Delivery Systems Bill.

Relationship with the Alcohol Industry

Supported by SAB Community Trust

SAB Community Trust has described itself as having a close association with NAFCOC for many years, stating it has provided “strong support” to the development of NAFCOC and its Scholarship Fund.[22]

SAB (South African Breweries) is a subsidiary of AB InBev, the world's largest beer brewer. Also see: SABMiller.

TobaccoTactics Resources

Relevant Link

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 NAFCOC, Introduction and Overview, 2017, accessed November 2018
  2. Nafcoc's newly elected president promises good leadership, SABC News, 4 December 2018, accessed January 2019
  3. NAFCOC, National Executive, 2017, accessed November 2018
  4. 4.0 4.1 Unknown, Profile of Lawrence Bhekinkosi Mavundla, undated, accessed November 2018
  5. O. Exstrum, ‘New booze laws will do more harm than good’, The Star, 18 May 2016, accessed November 2018
  6. Free Market Foundation, Quarterly Review 2016.06, 5 June 2017, accessed November 2018
  7. BAT Industries Plc, BAT Industries Limited Report on South African Subsidiaries under EEC Code Requirements as at 30th June 1980, June 1980, Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, Bates no: 201081932-201081942, accessed November 2018
  8. BAT Industries Plc, Report on South African Companies in Terms of EEC Code Requirements as at 30th June 1982, June 1982, Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, Bates no: 304081927-304081938, accessed November 2018
  9. BAT Industries Plc, Report on South African Companies in Terms of EEC Code Requirements as at 30th June 1983, October 1983, Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, Bates no: 201012083-201012094, accessed November 2018
  10. 10.0 10.1 BAT Industries Plc, Community Assistance Programmes of BAT Industries Subsidiaries in South Africa, undated, Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, Bates no: 201123305-201123306, accessed November 2018
  11. BAT Industries Plc, PAN: Public Affairs News, September 1980, Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, Bates no: 202025538-202025548, accessed November 2018
  12. BAT Industries Plc, Report on South African Companies in Terms of EEC Code Requirements, 30 June 1981, Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, Bates no: 201032884-201032891, accessed November 2018
  13. BAT Industries Plc, E.E.C. Code of Conduct for Companies with Interests in South Africa Report for Twelve Months to 30 June 1986, 31 October 1986, Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, Bates no: 201055348-201055358, accessed November 2018
  14. BAT Industries Plc, EEC Code of Conduct for Companies with Interests in South Africa, 30 June 1987, Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, Bates no: 201137073-201137083, accessed November 2018
  15. BAT Industries Plc, EEC Code of Conduct for Companies with Interests in South Africa, 29 October 1990, Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, Bates no: 201507337-201507338, accessed November 2018
  16. BAT Industries Plc, Report on South African Companies in Terms of EEC Code Requirements as at 30 June 1990, August 1990, Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, Bates no: 201507339-201507347, accessed November 2018
  17. BAT Industries Plc, Report on South African Companies in Terms of EEC Code Requirements as at 30 June 1992, undated, Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, Bates no: 201131737-201131745, accessed November 2018
  18. European Community Information Service, Code of Conduct Adopted for EC Companies in South Africa: Background Note, 23 September 1977, accessed November 2018
  19. C.O. Egbe, How South Africa is tightening its tobacco rules, The Conversation, 31 May 2018, accessed September 2018
  20. C. Ndaliso, Smoking rights in spotlight with new Bill, Daily News (South Africa), 10 August 2018, accessed November 2018
  21. 21.0 21.1 S. Ulucanlar, G.J. Fooks, A.B. Gilmore, The Policy Dystopia Model: An Interpretive Analysis of Tobacco Industry Political Activity, PLoS Medicine, 2016, 13(9):e1002125
  22. SAB Community Trust, Trust, March 1981, Truth Tobacco Industry Documents, Bates no: TI12730622, accessed November 2018